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German Art Trading Platform @Artnet Takes Over NY's ArtList to Boost Online Auctions

German Art Trading Platform @Artnet Takes Over NY's ArtList to Boost Online Auctions

Art Basel, a British art appraisal company was set to sign a deal to acquire the New York-based start-up but [the deal] went awry on the very day that it was meant to be signed. The next day, all five of ArtList‘s employees were let go, and the company summarily moved their belongings out of their shared office space at 356 Bowery,” she said. The site was launched in January 2015 by the young, hip French trio of Kenneth Schlenker, Astrid de Maismont, and Maxime Germain. “It had roughly 50 users and an inventory of some 300 works that were sold in three categories—prints and editions, unique works selling for below $50,000, and unique works above $50,000. Currently, there are 9,000 users registered users on the site,” added Jovanovic. ArtList, not to be confused with the London based art information website Artlyst, is the reincarnation of the art events startup Gertrude founded in 2012 by Schlenker, a former product marketing manager at Google, who will join Artnet as the new Chief Marketing Officer. de Maismont will also join Artnet’s auction department. Artnet, formerly Centrox Corp, is a leading online resource for the international art market and a premier destination to buy, sell and research art online. The company was founded in 1989 by French collector Pierre Sernet. In the 1990s, German art dealer Hans Neuendorf started investing in the company, becoming its chairman in 1992 and CEO in 1995, at which time the company’s name was changed to Artnet Worldwide Corp. In 1998, it was taken over by Artnet AG. In 2012, the company ceased publication of its online magazines, and Neuendorf’s son Jacob Pabst became the company’s chief executive. The Artnet Fine Art and Design Price Database and the Artnet Decorative Art Price Database feature over 10 million auction sale results since 1985 from over 1400 international auction houses. Market values and long-term price developments of artworks can be researched online. Artnet online Gallery Network, consisting of more than 2,200 international galleries worldwide. Collectors are able to search by artist, movement and medium and can contact sellers directly. This service is free of charge for collectors, while galleries pay a monthly fee. Artnet AG has a current market capitalization of 16.3 million euros. “It was a natural choice to acquire ArtList as part of our ever evolving trajectory to push these boundaries and expand the possibilities in the international art market,” said Pabst. “It is yet another step to revolutionize the auction genre.” Artnet is leading the development of a streamlined approach to fine art sales in the secondary market. Artnet is known for being at the cutting edge of art and technology, garnering “the most online traffic by far of any company in the art sales domain,” the company says. “ArtList was founded with the goal to buy and sell art online directly from owner-to-owner, without dependence on the brick-and-mortar auction houses,” said Schlenker . “With artnet’s illustrious history and enormous strength in the industry, we will be able to take our goals to the next level, working on a much larger scale and capitalizing on the millions of people who use artnet each month.” Photo (L-R): Maxime Germain, Artlist head of product; Astrid de Maismont, head of sales; Kenneth Schlenker, CEO.]]>

Brookfield Acquires Berlin's Potsdamer Platz From Savills FM for $1.4B

Brookfield Acquires Berlin's Potsdamer Platz From Savills FM for $1.4B

Potsdamer Platz History In the 1920s and 30s, Potsdamer Platz was the busiest and one of the liveliest squares in Europe. It was a major public transport hub and a popular entertainment district pulsating with life: the area contained numerous bars, cafes and cinemas. This all came to an abrupt end in 1943 when Potsdamer Platz was reduced to ruins by allied bombing. After the Second World War, the square was located between the American, British and Russian sectors and became a no-man’s land. The area was completely flattened with the construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961 when the remaining buildings on the east side of the wall were pulled down. In essence, after being ravaged by war, bombs and the demolition ball, the square was a no-man’s land between East and West Berlin for more than four decades. After the fall of the Berlin Wall it was decided to rebuild the whole, almost fifty hectare (124 acre) large area. Construction started in 1994 and for many years Potsdamer Platz was the largest construction site in Europe. The square, together with several adjacent blocks were redeveloped by renowned architects from around the world following a masterplan created by the Munich-based architectural firm of Hilmer & Sattler. The project included the construction of several office towers, a shopping arcade, an entertainment center and residential buildings as well as the necessary infrastructure such as streets and subway tunnels. The first building completed was the Debis Tower, a high-rise designed by Renzo Piano. It is part of the Daimler-Chrysler-Areal, one of three complexes that were built around the square. It is home to office towers, a shopping arcade and an Imax theatre. Piano placed particular importance on the quality of the public spaces: streets, lanes and squares modelled on the traditional European city center with attractive pavement cafés and shops. Another complex, bordering Tiergarten, is the more subdued Beisheim Center, which contains offices, hotels and residential buildings. The third and most famous complex is the Sony Center, designed by Helmut Jahn, an American architect of German descent. It features a tent-like roof inspired by Japan’s mount Fuji. The unmistakable symbol of the Sony Center, which opened in 2001, is an enormous white marquee-shaped roof covering the plaza of the center which consists of six buildings. At night, this spectacular roof construction of steel, glass and fabric is lit up with a kaleidoscope of color designed to reflect the changing nuances between sunset and complete darkness. The three complexes join together at Potsdamer Platz where three modern towers symbolize the rebirth of Potsdamer Platz. The wedge-shaped building on the left, the PwC building, was designed by Renzo Piano. The central brick tower is the Kollhoff-tower, named after its architect Hans Kollhoff. On the 24th and 25th floor of the tower is the Panoramapunkt, an observation deck with an open-air viewing platform. The third tower is the Bahn-Tower, a 26-story tower with a curved glass facade, designed by Helmut Jahn and built in 1998-2000.]]>