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Taiwan's GMobi Acquires Israeli Mobile Ad-Tech Startup @_MassiveImpact

Taiwan's GMobi Acquires Israeli Mobile Ad-Tech Startup @_MassiveImpact

Red Herring Top 100 Europe winner. “Selecting startups that show the most potential for disruption and growth is never easy,” said Alex Vieux, publisher and CEO of Red Herring. “We looked at hundreds and hundreds of candidates from all across the continent, and after much thought and debate, narrowed the list down to the Top 100 Winners. Each year, the competition gets tougher but we believe MassiveImpact demonstrates the vision, drive and innovation that define a Red Herring winner.” With this latest acquisition, which complements its existing mobile technology services, GMobi says it now provides app developers with a comprehensive advertising platform, encompassing a variety of web, mobile, and social channels. For GMobi customers, the MassiveImpact acquisition means “greater value via optimized targeting, content delivery, and end user experiences through the company’s real time performance platform.” “We’re excited to revolutionize how brands connect with consumers. Combined, GMobi and MassiveImpact’s technologies will transform mobile advertising experiences,” said Paul Wu, founder and CEO of GMobi. MassiveImpact founder and CEO, Sephi Shapira, said that, “The acquisition will add our strength and experience with social platforms to GMobi’s existing marketing campaigns and put GMobi in a highly competitive position in the mobile advertising industry.” GMobi is a global provider of mobile Internet services and products, driving revenue in emerging markets for mobile devices Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM’s). Founded in 2011 and backed by MediaTek, Trend Micro, SingTel Innov8 and CDIB, the company says it currently “partners with more than 100 OEMs on projects across 2000 different Android models, reaching over 150 million users worldwide.” Headquartered in Taiwan, GMobi has offices in China, India, Russia, Singapore, Thailand and the United States. Photo: Sephi Shapira, Co-Founder & CEO, MassiveImpact.]]>

Taiwan’s GlobalWafers to Acquire SunEdison Semi for $683M

Taiwan’s GlobalWafers to Acquire SunEdison Semi for $683M

GlobalWafers agreed to acquire the Silicon Business (FZ and CZ) of Denmark’s Topsil Semiconductor Materials A/S (CPH: TPSL) (Copenhagen Stock Exchange) for $48 million. SunEdison shareholders will receive $12.00 per share in cash, representing a 78.6% premium over SunEdison’s common stock average closing price during the previous 30 trading days, and a 44.9% premium to its closing price on August 17, 2016. “We are pleased to have reached an agreement that delivers a significant premium to our shareholders,” said SunEdison’s president and chief executive Shaker Sadasivam. “We are very excited by this transaction,” said Doris Hsu, chairperson and CEO of GlobalWafers. “We believe this combination is unique in that it merges two of the market’s key suppliers with minimal overlap in customers, products and production capacities.” The deal has been unanimously approved by both GlobalWafers’ and SunEdison’s boards of directors, and is subject to customary closing conditions including shareholder’s and regulatory approvals. SunEdison has obtained a waiver from the Securities Industry Council of Singapore concerning its sale to GlobalWafers. GlobalWafers will finance the takeover and debt refinancing through existing cash and committed financing from the Bank of Taiwan, Hua Nan Commercial Bank, Mega International Bank, Taipei Fubon Bank, and Taishin International Bank. Nomura Securities is acting as sole financial advisor to GlobalWafers, and White & Case LLP is acting as legal advisor to GlobalWafers. Barclays is acting as financial advisor to SunEdison, and Bryan Cave LLP and Rajah & Tann Singapore LLP are acting as legal advisors to SunEdison. Australia and New Zealand Banking Group is acting as independent financial advisor to the directors of SunEdison.]]>

Dutch Chipmaker $ASML to Acquire Taiwan's Hermes Microvision in $3.1B Deal

Dutch Chipmaker $ASML to Acquire Taiwan's Hermes Microvision in $3.1B Deal

Reuters. It comes after U.S. memory chipmaker Micron Technology Inc said late last year that it planned to buy the remaining interest in its Taiwanese joint venture in a deal valued around $3.2 billion. It would also be the latest consolidation in a global semiconductor industry faced with an increasingly saturated smartphone market – once a key growth driver – as well as the emergence of deep-pocketed Chinese players, Reuters added. “This acquisition is intended to make a strong product offering even stronger,” said ASML president and CEO Peter Wennink. “Our metrology technologies are complementary, and when combined offer the chance to significantly improve process control, and hence yields, for our customers. Our two companies have worked together for almost two years to see how we could best combine our capabilities, and found that we could significantly improve this constructive cooperation and better serve our customer by teaming up as one company.” “The combination of our two businesses is great news for all of our stakeholders, including our customers, employees, suppliers and investors, as it accelerates both companies` roadmap development. We intend to continue to invest and grow HMI`s business at our two existing locations in Taiwan, where we already employ around 350 people. The transition to sub-10 nm logic nodes and the ramp of advanced memory devices require innovation, and we look forward to continuing to help our customers make it a success, now by offering HMI and ASML technologies,” said Jack Jau, CEO at HMI. The transaction is expected to close in the fourth quarter of 2016 and is subject to customary closing conditions, including review by Taiwanese, U.S. and international regulators. Closing is also subject to approval by HMI`s shareholders. Hermes-Epitek Corp. (HEC) and certain affiliates, as well as certain officers of HMI, currently own approx. 48% of HMI shares in total and have agreed to support the transaction. HEC and certain HMI officers have also agreed to re-invest in ASML part of their proceeds. ASML expects to finance the acquisition with EUR 1.5 billion of debt, EUR 500 million of ASML equity to be purchased by HEC and the relevant HMI officers, and the remainder from available cash. The transaction is expected to be accretive to ASML`s EPS immediately. Goldman Sachs and Credit Suisse acted as financial advisors on the deal for HMI and ASML respectively. ASML is one of the world`s leading manufacturers of chipmaking equipment. ASML`s guiding principle is continuing towards ever smaller, cheaper, more powerful and energy-efficient semiconductors. ASML is a multinational company with close to 15,000 employees at over 70 locations in 16 countries, headquartered in Veldhoven, the Netherlands. HMI is the leading supplier of E-beam Inspection (EBI) tools for both foundry and memory fabs worldwide. Established in 1998, HMI is engaged in ongoing research and development of the most advanced EBI tools for semiconductor manufacturing fabs, based on its proprietary electron gun and column technologies and defect inspection algorithms. HMI delivers multiple product lines, including eScan, ePTM and eXplore Series, for various R&D and production applications, with it e-beam system positioned for sub-10 nm logic nodes.]]>

Taiwan's Foxconn Seals $3.5B Buyout of Japan's Sharp

Taiwan's Foxconn Seals $3.5B Buyout of Japan's Sharp

Reuters reported. At a packed news conference following the signing of the $3.5 billion deal, Foxconn CEO Terry Gou ducked questions about how – and when – Sharp would become profitable again, but expressed confidence in the Japanese company’s ability to bounce back with its highly regarded technology. Gou pointed to Sharp’s proprietary know-how to mass-produce the advanced IGZO (indium gallium zinc oxide) display technology as a standout, calling it superior to the popular OLED (organic light-emitting diode) technology. IGZO technology is used in products such as Apple Inc’s (NASDAQ: AAPL) iPad. “Everybody is saying OLED,” Gou said at the event held at Foxconn and Sharp’s jointly owned liquid crystal display factory in Sakai, western Japan. “If I was an engineer, I would choose IGZO,” he said, noting that they were more energy-efficient than OLEDs. Gou said he expected IGZO technology to be used in 60 percent of Sharp’s displays in future, against 40 percent for OLEDs. Nonetheless, turning around a company saddled with losses after two bank bailouts would not be easy and would require Foxconn to work “very hard,” Gou conceded. “I’m not going to sugar-coat the challenges,” he said. “But I have a clear roadmap in my heart,” the Foxconn chief added, suggesting that a detailed turnaround plan for Sharp is far from finalised. Gou said the management had ambitious plans for Sharp to be a key player in next-generation consumer products, including the Internet of Things and “smart” home appliances. “If we cannot drive changes in Sharp our global competitors will eat us alive.” Gou said he would try to retain all the jobs at Sharp, though he noted that Foxconn laid off 3-5 percent of its low-performing employees every year. Foxconn, formally known as Hon Hai Precision Industry Co, agreed to take a two-thirds stake in Sharp at a big discount to its original offer this week, after wrangling over potential liabilities that sowed more doubts over whether the two companies can work together to spark a revival in the Japanese firm. The deal provides cash-strapped Sharp with funds that the Japanese company said would be used in large part to start mass-producing OLED screens, which Apple is expected to adopt for its future iPhones. Sharp is playing catch-up with Korean rivals in OLED panels. (Reuters reporting by Makiko Yamazaki in SAKAI, Additional reporting by JR Wu in TAIPEI; Writing by Chang-Ran Kim; Editing by Shri Navaratnam).]]>